The Three-body Problem, and What America Can Learn from the Cultural Revolution

Science-fiction-inspired political action is my favourite kind.

Christoph Weber

I rarely write book reviews, but after reading The Three-body Problem I must yawp from my rooftop just how extraordinary this novel is, in the hope that others will experience the same mind-bending awe this masterpiece inspired in me.

The Three-body Problem is by no means slow, though it’s not exactly an action-packed, cliffhanger-type novel. I enjoy those as well, and I’ll highly recommend Red Rising if that’s what you’re looking for. But Liu Cixin didn’t need to blow shit up to keep me reading through the night: the sheer scope, originality, and power of his ideas do that job more than adequately.

The novel is set in China, largely in Beijing, a city in which I studied and worked for over a

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Achievement Unlocked

Delighted to announce my first sale of the year! My sci-fi alien story, ‘The Convincer’, will be appearing in Galaxy’s Edge. I’m ecstatic that this story has found a home in such a great venue, and can’t wait to share it with the world at last.

This was one of those stories that was eked out kicking and screaming. I knew what I wanted to say with it, as this story’s message is very close to my heart. But getting it to co-operate felt at times like wrestling jelly. I had to integrate a weird, complex alien society into a commentary on how we subjugate beings we deem inferior to ourselves, without sounding preachy, and with a workable plot. It took me ages to get the plot in shape, but once I had it I realised it had been heading that way all along, as is so often the case.

I’m really proud of this one. Watch this space for details on its future publication.

Annual Round-Up and Awards Eligibility

So… it’s still January, right?

Just.

I’m not sure where this month has gone. I’ve been meaning to write this post all year. Better late than never.

2016 was an amazing year for my productivity. I wrote ten short stories (more than ever in a single year!), made some good headway into my previously-languishing novel, and sent out 120 submissions. That’s about three times as many as the previous year. As a result of all that writing and submitting, I have more current subs out than I’ve ever had at once, which makes me feel like I’m doing this writing thing properly.

I also had four publications: two originals and two reprints, which is nice and symmetrical. My stories ‘Her Glimmering Facade’ and ‘Candy Comfort’ appeared in Deep Magic and Daily Science Fiction respectively. ‘Daddy’s Girl’ was reissued in glorious audio form at The Overcast, while ‘Rule of Five’ had its third publication in the all-female horror anthology Killing It Softly.

‘Candy Comfort’ and ‘Her Glimmering Facade’ are both awards eligible this year. If you’re reading for awards, I’d love you to consider them. ‘Candy Comfort’ is available to read for free via the link above, and as ‘Facade’ is behind a paywall, I’d be happy to send a copy to anyone who’s planning to vote. Just let me know in the comments.

2017 is off to a good start, as I’ve already written four flash stories and sent out thirteen subs. Let’s start as we mean to go on!

 

 

Why We Write

It’s been a scary year. The events of the past three weeks have felt like some kind of demon cherry on top of a glut of instability and fear-mongering. No one can know for sure what happens next, but the signs point to very unsettling possibilities.

I’ve seen all kinds of reactions from the writing community, ranging from dearths of creativity to fierce rallying cries. All those reactions are valid. Personally, I’ve been somewhere in the middle.

But it’s all got me thinking about the power of what we do. Writing is art, it’s communication, it’s portrayal of the world. It can be used for wondrous ends and horrendous ones. You’ve only got to look at the average British tabloid to see ample evidence of the latter. In many ways, those examples make it all the more encumbent on the rest of us writers to balance the scale in the other direction.

We write to process our thoughts and our ideas. We write to work through past hurts and present difficulties. We write to explore possibilities, to warn of dangers and to sow our hopes. Speculative fiction does this in ways other genres can’t, because it isn’t restricted to the world as we know it. Its scope extends to the futuristic, the fantastic, the alternative… with all of those things we can explore ‘what ifs’ and share visions of things that haven’t yet happened or delve into human nature from entirely new perspectives. The blog post I wrote on the importance of science fiction amply describes my thoughts on why it matters.

Our writing can draw attention to world issues by portraying them, veiled or openly, through the viewpoints of our characters. In doing this, we’re taking ideas beyond the factual, beyond informative articles and projections, and actually turning them into real-life situations. We only truly relate to these things by empathising with others going through them, and fiction provides that empathy in a way no other medium can. When I show what my persecuted refugee character is feeling, I enable my readers to connect with her and others like her. When I show how my rebel protagonist stands up against her totalitarian government, I enable readers to experience her anger and determination to put things right. When I show my alien character struggling to overturn her species’ discrimination against humans, I hope readers will see parallels in the way we continue to treat those we deem ‘inferior’.

Fiction is a reflection of its era, and the one we’re in now is rife with pitfalls and possibilities that we need to investigate. We need to explore the dangers through story before it’s too late for empathy. We need to show the bright alternatives before we’ve steered our path too far away from them. We need to work through our own fears, putting them into words both as catharsis and signpost.

This is why stories matter. This is why our society needs them more than ever.

This is why we write.

Killing It Softly

Wow, I seem to be all about the promo at the moment. I’m certainly not complaining that I’ve been able to announce a new publication for three consecutive months. That is fricking awesome. *grin* But I always intended this blog to contain other stuff too… writerly ramblings, pedantry, geekiness.

I’ll get back to that stuff. Promise.

But in the meantime, Killing It Softly, the all-female horror anthology featuring my story, ‘Rule of Five’, is now out!

 

Killing It Softly: A Digital Horror Fiction Anthology of Short Stories (The Best by Women in Horror Book 1) by [Fiction, Digital, Cunningham,Elaine, Holder,Nancy, Sydney,M.J., Rose,Rie Sheridan, Boudreau,Chantal, Blackthorn,Rose, McBride,Tracie, Gill,Carole, Rath, Tina , Suzanne Reynolds-Alpert]

 

 

This is my fifteenth fiction publication. Fifteen. *checks again to be sure* Yep. Amazing. It’s my second anthology sale. And it’s the third time ‘Rule of Five’ has been published. That little story has certainly done me proud. As I’ve mentioned before, it was the first story I ever sold. I love the fact that it’s still with me now, making sales and getting promoted, like a faithful friend along for the ride.

This is a story about OCD, a term that is bandied about far too often with complete disregard for its real implications. Having particular standards isn’t OCD. Liking things a certain way isn’t OCD. That ‘D’ stands for ‘disorder’, and those things are not disorders. If this story in any way manages to shed some light on what it feels like to have obsessive compulsive disorder, I’m happy.

It’s also scary. It is a horror story, after all.

And in the lead-up to Halloween, the Kindle version of the anthology is available for only 99 cents! After that, it goes up to $5.99, so I highly recommend grabbing a terrific bargain while you can. There are 32 stories here, written by some amazingly talented women. All for 99 cents, people. What are you waiting for?

It’s time to get spooky. Snuggle up on the couch, keep the lights on, and get reading.

Happy Samhain, everyone.